Action Wares “The Craftsman” Apron

For those of you who don’t know what I am up to these days, I am here to give you a full update AND a favorite new product review.

I am currently studying Industrial Design in Milwaukee Wisconsin. That means my life is a never ending cycle of sketching, refining, prototyping, cutting, sanding, painting, finishing and presenting. Here is a selection of my projects from the semester:

As you can see, this program is making-intensive. I spend more time in the 3D lab than I do in my bed… and that’s not an exaggeration. Speaking of my bed, it’s really important that I don’t bring these toxic materials home with me into my living space. We often work with toxic wood fillers and high density foam. We can protect our lungs with respirators, but it’s important to control the amount of dust and material that gets on our clothes. High density urethane dust in the ID world is comparable to glitter in the art world– it sticks to everything and never fully disappears.

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So a few weeks into the semester I decided to find an apron… but not just any apron.

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Peter Wadey is the owner and operator of Action Wares, a specialty canvas apron operation. Peter sent me two canvas aprons, a customized “The Craftsman” apron and a slightly shorter adapted style apron. My Craftsman apron is black canvas with brown stitching, and the second apron is a denim blue canvas with red stitching.

I have gotten a tremendous amount of use out of Peter Wadey’s apron. Not only has it protected my clothes from the perils of lab processes, it has also increased my efficiency. There are three main chest pockets– perfect for pencils, safety glasses, spare bits of acrylic and any other random thing that might come in handy in the lab. There are two main hip pockets that house larger items– my tape measurer, a level, a notebook, etc.

My favorite feature of these aprons is the crossed back straps. These are more comfortable than the typical around-the-neck apron straps. The two straps cross in the back and are then threaded through loops at the hips. This systems allows for easy adjustment of how high the apron sits.

This apron doesn’t get in my way, it moves with me. Take a look at the timelapse below that features me hard at work in my Action Wares Craftsmen apron. If you notice, the lab-tech, Delia, who shows up periodically in the timelapse is also sporting an apron by Peter Wadey.

One of the best things about Peter Wadey is that he will work with you in order to create the perfect apron for you. I already have ideas for my next one– although I am guessing it will take years to wear this one down. I have trouble keeping my pens and pencils from falling out of my pockets, so a pocket-flap or pocket-synch would fix this problem. Delia’s apron is now 1 year old and her right pocket has worn down from constant clipping and unclipping of her measuring tape. For future reference doubling up on the canvas for this pocket would delay the inevitable wear and tear of everyday use.

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Overall, this apron has been a fantastic find. Make sure to check out Peter Wadey’s aprons for your next woodworking, crafting, gardening, or cooking apron needs!

 

 

Our trip to Å

“Å” is one of the three extra letters in the Norwegian alphabet, but it is also the name of a village that sits on the southern end of the Lofoten archipelago. Maria, Margit and I spent our third day in Lofoten on a road trip down to Å.

Unfortunately (or luckily) I don’t know how to drive a manual car, so I was simply along for the ride. Thanks for being my chauffeur, ladies!

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I spent the whole car ride with my camera around my neck, constantly asking them to slow down in order to capture a through-the-window shot of the stunning surroundings.

We made numerous pit-stops on our way down to Å, the first being at Ramberg Beach.

The next stop was in Sund, an area known for their welded bird sculptures. The museum required a ticket to enter, (which we didn’t pay for,) so I don’t know much more about it.

Shortly after Sund, we stopped to pick up a french hitch-hiker headed towards Å. He was more skeptical of us than we were of him, and he definitely didn’t catch our humor or sarcasm.

Although she was missed, we decided it was a good thing Vigdis didn’t join us on our road trip. She would have been annoyed with our constant car-stopping, photo-taking, and selfie-spinning selves. Margit had to run away from a seagull that decided to attack her in Reine, and almost fell off the rocks in Å, (pictured below.) We were tourists, and we weren’t trying to hide it.

Hiking up Skottinden

Our second day in Leknes began like most days, with bread, coffee, and laughs. While Vigdis was hard at work, Margit, Maria, and I walked to Leknessjøen (Leknes Lake) in complete awe of our surroundings. With every turn we were faced with a new landscape just as jaw-dropping as the last. We were reminded of just how small Leknes really is when we ran into the lady Maria and I hitch-hiked with the day before. After tanning (like Norwegians) by the lake, we headed back to prepare dinner.

Vigdis returned from work just in time for dinner. After loading up on food and coffee, we set out on our first hike up Skottinden. As you can see below, Skottinden is a steep mountain with unique shape that stands out from the landscape.

 

As we began our trip to the summit, I realized my legs weren’t quite as strong as they used to be.

I had trouble keeping up with the Norwegian mountain-goddesses… but I am going to blame it on the constant amazing views.

We carefully maneuvered past a hole of unknown depth, (that took the life of a woman back in 1994,) in order to reach the summit. As if the views during the hike weren’t jaw-dropping enough, the view from the top was spectacular.

We somehow managed to find enough room up there to dance, skip, and practice our headstands before heading back down the mountain.

 

Lofoten Norway: Day One

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Lofoten is a stunning archipelago off of the northern coast of Norway. Maria, Margit and I made the trip to Leknes (an island near the southern tip of Lofoten) to visit our crazy cool Northern-Norwegian friend, Vigdis.

Boarding the plane!

Maria and I landed at the Leknes airport in the late morning. I use the word “airport” loosely because the runway is about the size of an american suburban driveway and the luggage belt is the size of a grocery store checkout counter.

Margit and Vigdis were due to arrive later that night so Maria and I had some time to kill. After hitching a ride into the center of town, we decided to explore. 6 minutes later, we deemed the town: explored. leknes3

While pondering what to do, we spotted a store that had a “Tourist Info” sign in the window. There was a guy (about our age) who was immediately eager to help us. We asked him for suggestions on what to do with the 5 hours we had left on our own. His response was basically: “Oh, you want to do something? You should probably go to the next town, Gravdal.”

Fast forward a few hours and we discover that the hospital is Gravdal’s greatest attraction. We decided to head back to Leknes and wait for our funny friends to arrive. Cups and cones of softis, (soft-serve ice cream, but 100% yummier), made the time fly by!