India Phase 0: Getting There

We were relatively packed and prepared the night before departure day– considering it was closely following our crazy family’s Christmas festivities. Leading up to departure day, my dad and I carefully scheduled our morning routine in order to arrive at the airport at the optimal time. We calculated the time we needed to get ready, pack the car, pick up Lars, and get to Dulles Airport in time for our 8am flight. In order to decrease the amount of my morning “get ready minutes,” I drew on my eyebrows the night before– with the hopes that they would remain in tact. Kayla laid out her plane outfit which included both utility gauchos and a well stocked fanny pack.

Kayla's Plane Outfit

With a few final permitherin sprays, last minute packing and medication preparations, we turned off the lights for a quick few hours of shut eye before our early departure.

Our 3am alpine start began on a good note. My eyebrows were intact, we all had our passports, and we backed out of the driveway just 7 minutes later than intended (a difference that fell well within our timeline cushion.)

As we turned the corner into Lars’s neighborhood, the Battery Charge indicator light turned on.

*Side note: The last time this light came on in my mother’s van, the van broke down on the side of the highway and my dad and I had to perform a rainy night roadside rescue.

Lars loads his bags into the car and we make it to the end of the street before turning back to switch vans. We didn’t want to take the chance of breaking down on our way up to Washington DC. So we decided to take the “trusty red van” instead.

*Side note #2: The red van has 252,000 miles on it. Despite the occasional need to pop the hood and unplug some wires, and the constant illuminated check engine light, it’s deservingly been named the “trusty red van.” It’s zig-zagged the country, coated the coasts and it’s continued survival has defied all odds.

So imagine the 4 of us, scrambling to unload our suitcases from the blue van and repacking them into the red van, while Kayla is hacking into the bushes of Lars’s front yard. Why was she sick? We don’t know. And we didn’t really ask because our van-switch was more important at the time. We had been wondering which of us was going to get sick first on this India trip– Kayla won (or lost) and got sick before we even got to india.

The whole van-switch hubabaloo set us back another 16 minutes. Although Papa and I didn’t account for a van-switch in our timeline, we still arrived at the airport in plenty of time.

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The rest of the 24 hour journey was a blur of surprisingly yummy airplane meals, comical first-time flight attendants navigating their first big trip, and sister-synchronized Supergirl episodes.

Plane Napping

The five of us arrived in Delhi with 4/6 of our bags, and 15 days of adventure ahead of us.

Stay tuned for Phases 1-4.

 

 

Action Wares “The Craftsman” Apron

For those of you who don’t know what I am up to these days, I am here to give you a full update AND a favorite new product review.

I am currently studying Industrial Design in Milwaukee Wisconsin. That means my life is a never ending cycle of sketching, refining, prototyping, cutting, sanding, painting, finishing and presenting. Here is a selection of my projects from the semester:

As you can see, this program is making-intensive. I spend more time in the 3D lab than I do in my bed… and that’s not an exaggeration. Speaking of my bed, it’s really important that I don’t bring these toxic materials home with me into my living space. We often work with toxic wood fillers and high density foam. We can protect our lungs with respirators, but it’s important to control the amount of dust and material that gets on our clothes. High density urethane dust in the ID world is comparable to glitter in the art world– it sticks to everything and never fully disappears.

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So a few weeks into the semester I decided to find an apron… but not just any apron.

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Peter Wadey is the owner and operator of Action Wares, a specialty canvas apron operation. Peter sent me two canvas aprons, a customized “The Craftsman” apron and a slightly shorter adapted style apron. My Craftsman apron is black canvas with brown stitching, and the second apron is a denim blue canvas with red stitching.

I have gotten a tremendous amount of use out of Peter Wadey’s apron. Not only has it protected my clothes from the perils of lab processes, it has also increased my efficiency. There are three main chest pockets– perfect for pencils, safety glasses, spare bits of acrylic and any other random thing that might come in handy in the lab. There are two main hip pockets that house larger items– my tape measurer, a level, a notebook, etc.

My favorite feature of these aprons is the crossed back straps. These are more comfortable than the typical around-the-neck apron straps. The two straps cross in the back and are then threaded through loops at the hips. This systems allows for easy adjustment of how high the apron sits.

This apron doesn’t get in my way, it moves with me. Take a look at the timelapse below that features me hard at work in my Action Wares Craftsmen apron. If you notice, the lab-tech, Delia, who shows up periodically in the timelapse is also sporting an apron by Peter Wadey.

One of the best things about Peter Wadey is that he will work with you in order to create the perfect apron for you. I already have ideas for my next one– although I am guessing it will take years to wear this one down. I have trouble keeping my pens and pencils from falling out of my pockets, so a pocket-flap or pocket-synch would fix this problem. Delia’s apron is now 1 year old and her right pocket has worn down from constant clipping and unclipping of her measuring tape. For future reference doubling up on the canvas for this pocket would delay the inevitable wear and tear of everyday use.

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Overall, this apron has been a fantastic find. Make sure to check out Peter Wadey’s aprons for your next woodworking, crafting, gardening, or cooking apron needs!

 

 

Our trip to Å

“Å” is one of the three extra letters in the Norwegian alphabet, but it is also the name of a village that sits on the southern end of the Lofoten archipelago. Maria, Margit and I spent our third day in Lofoten on a road trip down to Å.

Unfortunately (or luckily) I don’t know how to drive a manual car, so I was simply along for the ride. Thanks for being my chauffeur, ladies!

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I spent the whole car ride with my camera around my neck, constantly asking them to slow down in order to capture a through-the-window shot of the stunning surroundings.

We made numerous pit-stops on our way down to Å, the first being at Ramberg Beach.

The next stop was in Sund, an area known for their welded bird sculptures. The museum required a ticket to enter, (which we didn’t pay for,) so I don’t know much more about it.

Shortly after Sund, we stopped to pick up a french hitch-hiker headed towards Å. He was more skeptical of us than we were of him, and he definitely didn’t catch our humor or sarcasm.

Although she was missed, we decided it was a good thing Vigdis didn’t join us on our road trip. She would have been annoyed with our constant car-stopping, photo-taking, and selfie-spinning selves. Margit had to run away from a seagull that decided to attack her in Reine, and almost fell off the rocks in Å, (pictured below.) We were tourists, and we weren’t trying to hide it.